Black Development

mirror tom

Uncle Toms are the greatest threat to black America. In 2017 Uncle Tom might take the form of Dr. Dre on Monday, T.D Jakes on Tuesday, Future on Thursday and morph into Very Smart Brothas by week’s end. Even I, the writer, am guilty. In his autobiography Malcolm X indicated that he could stomach a conservative racist more than an Uncle Tom. Malcolm understood the danger. If black people are to achieve true revolution and freedom, we must eliminate Tom, wherever he might be found.

The trouble in 2017 is that we don’t understand what makes one an Uncle Tom and we resist the notion that each of us, woke as we believe ourselves to be, have some Uncle Tom in us. Again, I myself am not exempt.

The Uncle Tom, for our purpose, is any person who identifies as black but actively or passively undermines black power; black power= black freedom and self determination. This can be momentary or a permanent condition, for some. Holding conservative views does not make one an Uncle Tom. Having liberal views –which I do– does not make one aligned with black power, either. In fact, the most dangerous Uncle Toms in 2017 happen to be liberals/Democrats. The danger we pose is that we think ourselves woke because of our liberalism. When our lives are misaligned with the ideals of black power and independence, however, we have to be convinced that we are in fact Uncle Toms.

By virtue of American citizenship all black people wrestle with some level of internal Tom. Indeed, it is often a necessary evil for survival. In the 1940’s it may have been necessary to buy from white folks to literally escape death. Survival. In today’s world Van Jones went from basically condemning Trump voters on election night as bigots to now traveling the country, holding town halls with Trump supporters to explore their “viewpoints.” Again, survival. But black power is beyond survival and to attain it we must be mature enough to reflect on our level of Uncle Tom and work to kill that son of a bitch. Are you bold enough to join this collective journey and identify which variety of Tom lives in you?

The Religious Uncle Tom

Bishop T.D Jakes has shined brighter than most preachers for years. His books and sermons have reached millions. Still, given his tremendous platform, it is fair to ask how it all has furthered the quest for black freedom. The bishop is to be commended for preaching a message of self-healing and empowerment but he is positioned to actually erect or support institutions to help facilitate that empowerment. Based on the ministries his church website promotes, this is not the case. Further, sermons are fine but black people need his voice to confront the many crises we face on a more consistent basis.

Yes, his ministry helps ex-offenders and needy people but because the Bishop has been given much, more is required. Some might say his role as a preacher is simply to inspire individuals, who then will minister to society. That argument is tempting but disarmed when the history of the black church is considered. The African Methodist Episcopal (AME) church is the oldest denomination founded by black people in America, back in 1816. They preached the word but also built colleges like Wilberforce University and by 1880, operated over 2,000 schools. In an era of strict segregation, their congregations raised the money needed to keep those schools operational.

In a time when black people literally risked death for speaking out on social issues, AME bishops like Henry Mcneal Turner were fearless in the political arena. From the dangerous terrain of central Georgia, Turner successfully ran for the state legislature and used his voice as a trumpet for justice. Jakes, on the other hand, speaks loudly on prosperity but historically has been mute on topics of black oppression. He plays it safe, not wanting to alienate supporters. Turner risked his life to speak out but Jakes appears apprehensive about losing offerings or influence. After all, he never would have gotten a talk show had he gone all Jeremiah Wright.

The religious Uncle Tom is dangerous and I have been him. My thoughts were of heaven and developing the self toward godliness. In that state I chose to downplay social issues, having been taught that if we all just stopped sinning everything would be fine. I knew oppression existed but again, I was told that it was the result of sin. I saw racism but rather than call it out, I was taught that we should focus on –you guessed it– the sinful nature. I was told that it was godly to bring people together rather than directly rebuke those who oppress others. Those who taught me seemed unaware that it was Jesus who said that he did “not come to bring peace but a sword.” As we looked to the sky in our piety, we failed to see the urgency on planet earth.

I prayed often but the ills of the world persisted. At times I even tried to feed the hungry but never evolved to the understanding of Archbishop Hélder Câmara, who said, “When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist.” The religious institutions I belonged to played it safe. Feeding hungry people earned our nonprofit a grant. Speaking against those who oppress the poor and building institutions that promote power, however, might lose offerings and friends. Our nonprofits ultimately rendered us “non-prophets.”

Some of our churches can raise a nice offering. In fact, the black church is one of the few institutions that successfully pools the capital of black people. Those dollars, however, go toward maintaining facilities and the work of the “ministry.” We can’t seem to connect the dots. Our community faces crises in employment and resources and yet, the church’s successful pooling of black capital never results in job creation or combatting the deep disparities our communities face. The church building remains in tact, however, as the neighborhood crumbles. We believe we are doing the Lord’s work but in fact, we hinder the progress of black people.

Black churches have not the luxury to exist as other churches do. No other group in America had to emerge from the depths of chattel slavery, live under neo slavery/Jim Crow and seek equality in the face of constant harassment, void of meaningful reparations. The urgency, focus and commitment required to overcome this legacy leaves no room for passivity. Here are a few tangible ways to take action as a faith community:

  1. Use money collected from members to start a fund to support local entrepreneurs and black institutions, such as your closest HBCU.
  2. Deposit church funds into a black owned bank.
  3. Use the pulpit and church communications to direct members to business owners in the congregation and the community.
  4. Require candidates for public office to articulate their plan for black empowerment through economic development prior to giving them a platform at your church.
  5. Use the pulpit to rebuke policies and policymakers that hinder black freedom, especially locally.

To kill Tom must be a daily fight and it is difficult. On the other side of that fight, however, is a world where black people are free, independent and collectively walk in power. Religion can serve the aim of liberation or pacify both the oppressed and the powerful.

Stay tuned for the next installment on “The Hood Uncle Tom”

 

freedom logo

How many paper towels did you use this month? How many of those paper towels created jobs for black people? If we want different results, we have to take different actions. Once again, Freedom Paper Company is a black owned firm that produces paper products, including paper towels. If you care about ending black unemployment, it’s time to do your part and make the switch.

We can end black unemployment, as I’ve discussed previously. The key is simply identifying one product or service each month that you already use and finding a black owned company to fill that need permanently. I don’t know anyone who doespaper towels not use paper towels. You spill some water: paper towel. You drop an egg on the floor: paper towel. You want to wipe off the countertop: paper towel. You get the point. We already buy paper towels and we will continue to. Why not switch to a great product that gets us closer to our goals as a people?

Would you like to stretch your dollar? Buy the Freedom Super Jumbo Roll. One case should last an entire year. While most competitors sell 78 sheets per roll, the Super Jumbo Roll has 210. You could pay .022 center per sheet but with Freedom Paper, your cost is .013 cents per sheet. Click here to make a purchase now. Freedom is the company name and the promise.

 

 

freedom paper

You can literally create a job for someone by wiping your ass. No, seriously. Based in Maryland, the Freedom Paper Company is a black owned firm that produces paper products, including “bathroom tissue.” The founder of the company is serious about creating great products and more importantly, creating a black presence in industrial production. I have met with him personally and heard his passion for business and communal uplift. That is why I dropped my old tissue brand. Now with every wipe, I am doing my part to end black unemployment.

We can end black unemployment, as I’ve discussed previously. The key is simply identifying one product or service each month that you already use and finding a black owned company to fill that need permanently. This month consider switching your freedom paperbathroom tissue brand. Not only is Freedom Paper offering a product that has an amazing impact socially, it is also a game-changer environmentally. Their bathroom tissue is made from 100% recycled paper — 100%. As someone who cares deeply about the environment and what condition we leave this planet in for future generations, this distinction is invaluable. I can think of very few other purchases which will move us toward ending black unemployment by promoting sustainability. I have no intentions of going back.

The time for a switch is now. We can promote hiring in our community and also promote environmental sustainability. What else is there to think about? You can go to the corner store to pick up a roll or two but to stretch your dollar further, it pays to buy in bulk. Click here to purchase your Freedom Paper bathroom tissue for the next couple of months for $20.00. Unless you actually eat toilet paper, the twenty-four rolls (500 sheets each) should last you as an individual a couple of months, at least. This one is pretty straightforward, there’s not much to think about. Make the switch and do your part to end black unemployment. Make the switch and help preserve our environment. Freedom Paper is more than a brand, it’s a promise.

moonlight-19405x

It was not strange to work under white people ten years my senior when I was 18. Around 30, however, I was enraged that I routinely interviewed to work under people who were slightly younger –or the same age– and less credentialed. The moment you realize your graduate degree is no match for your boss’s B.A. in music, you begin to question how “post-racial” we are. Joi McMillon, a black woman, knew very well the rage that stems from seeing whites with less qualifications advance while she did not. She was told she lacked the right experience while her less qualified white peers were advancing. But Joi will not experience that rage again. She is a film editor who made history with her Oscars nomination for her work on Moonlight; a film based on the writing of two black men, directed by a black man with a black cast. The self determination of black people ended Joi’s frustration, not the benevolence of whites.

In a world where discrimination and disparities abound, it is critical that black people create our own opportunities and support those endeavors as a community. Joi was nominated for an academy award precisely because of such an endeavor. Sean Combs became a music mogul only because Uptown Records, a company founded by a black man, gave the young college dropout the opportunity to become a talent director. It is doubtful that Combs would have been given the same opportunity at another major label. In the same way, Moonlight is a work of black self determination which afforded McMillon the opportunity to finally move up from “first assistant editor” into the editor’s role. The quality of her work is obvious, for even the Academy had to give her a nod. McMillon never lacked talent but simply opportunity, in a white male-dominated film industry. Rather than waiting for acknowledgment from benevolent white people, the creators of Moonlight created an opportunity for Joi.

Moonlight’s excellence led to their infamously delayed Oscars award. That mixup was far less controversial than Jada Pinkett-Smith igniting the #OscarsSoWhite firestorm. While several have opined that Pinkett-Smith’s motives may not have been pure (oddly, Denzel failed to take home an Oscar this year and Jada raised no fuss), we should not discount what Jada actually said when she told the world, “Maybe it is time…we make programs for ourselves that acknowledge us in ways we see fit.” Also, “Begging for acknowledgement or even asking, diminishes dignity and diminishes power.” Moonlight fulfills much of Jada’s sentiments. We should appreciate that the Academy (after some delay) awarded Moonlight best picture but only celebrating that misses the larger significance of the film. Moonlight gives us yet another model of what we should all be striving toward in every industry. In a world in which even black people with a college degree are more than twice as likely to be unemployed than our non-black peers, we need strong black institutions and creative ventures, brought about by our own self-determination.

There is only one thing that could have made Moonlight even more triumphant and that is if the movie was also financed by our community. By no fault of their own, the creators of the film had to seek financing from outside of our community and thankfully, they found it through A24, an Indie distributor. Still, we must continue striving to attain that next level of independence and power and that is to self finance our own ventures. As we support our own, that will happen. Joi had her day but now let us continue investing in our community to create opportunity for millions more. HopewellThought will continue our campaign each month to help get you started.

**No One Can Oppress You Unless You Give Them The Money To Do So**

lips

I’ve never been a fan of Valentine’s Day. Why? I’m a good guy and as such, V-Day only serves to mitigate my actions the other 364 days of the year. If I’m good to a woman all year but fail to produce on this day, I’m discounted. On the other hand, if I treat a woman subpar all year but produce this one day, I get points. Valentine’s Day is set up perfectly for even the sorriest man to score points…but even this day can’t help an unemployed man. If a man–even a good man–doesn’t have a check, the woman he desires won’t be the envy of her coworkers on the 14th. For an unemployed man, Valentine’s Day is a lost opportunity. HopewellThought is committed to attacking black unemployment this year and this month it starts with your mouth.

Last month I laid out our 2017 strategy toward ending black unemployment. If you haven’t, I’d strongly encourage you to read that first before continuing this journey. We can make significant strides simply by identifying one product or service each month we already use, then begin using a black owned company to fill that need going forward. Now back to this. I’m single but it doesn’t mean that I don’t keep my mouth ready. I’ve been told that I keep Listerine in business. For years I’ve used their mouthwash. Listerine breath strips have been in my pocket since they hit the market. I even use their dental floss. I. Stay. Ready. That said, the idea of using a different mouthwash never crossed my mind. That changed when I came across a black owned company, Garner’s Garden, that produces a 100% all natural mouthwash; a company actively looking to expand and hire black people. Still, I’ve been a Listerine guy forever and change is difficult. After all, Valentine’s Day is approaching and my mouth needs to be ready, just in case! I decided to reach out to the owner.

I purchased my bottle of mouthwash and gave it a try. As the owner explained, this product is not simply designed to cover up mouthwashbad breath but to actually heal your mouth. That sounded good. I want my mouth to be ready, after all. It contains healing oxygen particles that attack a host of dental issues such as cavities, gingivitis and gum disease. Not only is it antibacterial but it is also antiviral, anti-fungal and it whitens teeth naturally. I found every bit of that to be true. I felt my mouth getting healthier when I started using it. It burned like hell the very first time I tried it; that’s because it was healing everything my Listerine did not. It no longer burns now, my mouth feels healthy. I’ve also noticed that I no longer have that “Enter the Dragon” morning breath! I’m sold.

The company also sells a “remineralizing tooth powder,” which they recommend using in tandem with the mouthwash. In all honesty, I was most skeptical of this part of the deal. After all, I’m accustomed to toothpaste. In my research, however, I discovered that every toothpaste on the market is made up of a tooth-powder-4ozbunch of poisons. The tooth powder is a natural product that literally pulls toxins from your mouth and naturally whitens teeth. I’m getting used to it and I like the results thus far. As a consumer, I appreciate the fact that the mouthwash and tooth powder are getting my mouth ready for Valentine’s Day (just in case), naturally. Most of all, I love that my purchases are going toward providing jobs in my community.

You can purchase the mouthwash here and get a 10% discount this month when you use the code “HopewellThought.” If you’d really like to make sure your mouth is ready for Valentine’s Day and save even more, buy the mouthwash and tooth powder together here. You’ll receive 15% off when you purchase the two products together, using the code “HopewellThought2.”

Valentine’s Day is no picnic for an unemployed man, nor is any other day. We have the power to begin creating jobs in our community now, simply by getting our mouths ready.

**Be sure to also purchase our featured products from each prior month**

January–True Laundry Detergent 

 

MLK Memorial

You will die one day for no one lives forever. When people gather to celebrate your life and mourn your passing, would it be okay if they mentioned your deeds as a teenager but not those of your mature self? Would you rest in peace knowing they opted not to tell people of your most urgent convictions? You would roll in your grave and yet this is precisely what we do every year on King Day. The nation’s annual bastardizing of King’s legacy is hindering the progress of black people seeking liberation. This most recent King celebration must be the last of its kind.

I cannot stomach another King holiday in which we make vague statements about equality and peace. Peace was the last thing King had on his mind when he died. His thoughts were of bringing pain. As he told an audience the night before his death, “Now we must…redistribute that pain.” The pain he was referring to was that of poor sanitation workers in Memphis who were striking. The redistribution of it was to be felt by corporations, which up to that point had been responsible for or at least apathetic to black suffering. In seeking to move from that suffering to true liberation, King told his audience, “We don’t have to argue with anybody.” Rather than argue and protest, King admonished his audience that night to practice the power of “economic withdrawal.” King was over marching and debating. His calculus was simple: we have money and we can simply withhold it to hurt our enemies, then use it to strengthen ourselves. No argument needed. Yet each King holiday fosters fresh arguments with those who don’t see a problem with our nation’s treatment of black people, empty marches and some hollow acknowledgment of America’s progress. This can’t actually be helping us.

The King holiday presents black America with a fresh opportunity to embrace apathy. It is an occasion in which we are reminded to be good, peaceful and love our enemies. We should reject that message and embrace a violent commitment to that which the mature King taught us. This is why HopewellThought chose to launch a yearlong buy black campaign this month. The time for arguing is over. We are celebrating King’s legacy by actually living up to it, not concealing it with empty pleasantries. If you have not already, read up on what we are doing and get involved. Reflecting on “peace” and praising America for all her “progress” has done nothing to change the fact that black unemployment has been double that of our white counterparts since we’ve kept stats. Giving America a pat on the back for spotting a black man a holiday has not created jobs in our neighborhoods or helped our entrepreneurs access the capital they so badly need. This cannot be the celebration Dr. King had in mind.

If we are to celebrate this day we must do so in a different way. No more empty words and feel-good service projects. Those things are befitting of the 26 year old Dr. King who was the front man for the Montgomery Bus Boycott but not the mature leader who came to Memphis years later to redistribute pain. King felt no need to argue with anyone–he saw an opportunity to take power. The Dr. King who spoke in Memphis the night before his death was fully grown in his thoughts and convictions. He’d seen the weaknesses of the movement up to that point. He’d learned from his earlier successes and failures. He was ready to lead black America down a path toward true progress and power. Then he was shot. Since that time his voice has been muted in history and we are annually seduced by a holiday in his honor; it has been perverted and lacks the revolutionary spirit of the man it claims to honor. Join the campaign and let’s truly honor the legacy of Dr. King because this is not helping us.

 

 

black man working

I refuse to see another jobless black person and do nothing about it. You are free to waste time, asking whether black people want to work or join me in creating opportunities for us to work. It will not come from new gun control legislation or a politician. We don’t need the White House or a new program. All we need is for us as black people to love ourselves enough to choose us. 2017 is a year of action and this is a twelve month blueprint. Change your mind and black unemployment ends this year.

Since records have been kept, black people have been unemployed at twice the rate of whites but this year we can change that. The problem is not hard to solve in theory but it requires black people to accept that no one is coming to save us. It requires a commitment to ourselves, unless you believe Trump has a better plan.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics tells us that in 2015 there were roughly 1.8 million unemployed blacks in America seeking work. A simple FactFinder search reveals that there are actually over 2 million Black-owned businesses in the country. This means that if every black-owned firm hired just one black person (black companies are more likely to hire black people), black unemployment would no longer exist. Black companies cannot hire unless they have a need for more workers. They will only need more workers if they have more customers. We must become those customers and this blueprint will show you how.

The 12 Month Blueprint

Buying black can seem overwhelming but this blueprint makes it easy; you don’t even have to change your shopping habits overnight. My system is to simply identify ONE product or service each month–one you already buy–and find a black-owned company to fill that need going forward. It’s that simple. This system works because it does not require you to buy things you don’t want or need for the sake of “buying black.” You are only identifying purchases which you already make on a recurring basis and that is what will make you a reliable customer to a black business going forward. Beginning this month, we will shift billions into our community and create jobs for every person who desires to work, one product at a time. Let me help you get started.

The easiest way to begin shifting our buying habits is through household products such as toilet paper, laundry detergent, paper towels and the like–items we frequently buy. Beginning with this post, I will write an article each month featuring one household product from a black-owned business. The featured posts will include product information and new discount codes! All you need to do is read the new post each month to view the product and any new discount codes then click, buy and share. It’s really that easy (subscribing to this blog will help you follow along). As we take this journey together in 2017, the hope is that each month we will not only try the newly featured product of the month but also continue buying previously featured products going forward. We will create jobs one product at a time.

What if you try but don’t like the featured product of the month? There are still 30 days in a month for you to find another product or service–one you purchase on a recurring basis–from a black business and buy it. If you find yourself in that situation, try WeBuyBlack.com, Tuloko.com, Spendefy.com, BlackBizScope.com or MillionsTwoOne.com to find other products and services. The goal is to make sure each month you identify one product or service you already buy and begin buying it from a black-owned company. As we continue purchasing together, we will help black businesses grow and hire. We will also keep our dollars away from companies that don’t care about us as black people. The choice is ours. Below is this month’s featured product.

True Laundry Detergent

True Detergent is one of the most effective laundry detergents available on the market. True Detergent is 4x concentrated and allows consumers to use less soap. While the leading brands cost consumers an average of .25 cents per load, True comes in at .17 cents! It is void of any caustic ingredients and animal essences, thus making it a truly safe detergent for all types of machines and fabrics and also safe for the whole family. Powerful and economical, its concentrated nature allows users to use less soap for more cleaning power leading to tremendous savings and results. Click here to buy and use the code “HopewellThought” to get FREE SHIPPING, when you buy at least two bottles (of any size) by February 12th.

Looking for a business opportunity? True Products is looking for distributors across the country. This brand is growing fast and now is the perfect time to position yourself to take advantage of that growth. If you would like to actually get paid for supporting a black business, check out the True Products affiliate program.

walmart

Rejecting blatant racism does not make you an “ally” to black people seeking power to determine their own fate in America. The true test of an ally is whether they believe our quest for self-determination is legitimate and truly support it. WalMart does not pass the test. A recent article on Breitbart complained that WalMart no longer sold items displaying the Confederate Flag, yet featured shirts with messaging supportive of the Black Lives Matter movement on the company’s website. WalMart caved and in doing so, legitimized a twisted logic that views the struggle for black self determination and freedom as equally offensive as the southern rebels’ treasonous devotion to slavery. This system of thought delegitimizes the pursuit of black power and WalMart catered to it. In the era of Walter Scott and Michael Brown, black people must carefully consider whether we can allow these small seeds of hostility to harvest into blood.

kanye-prez

Kanye West is so gifted that he is insane. He has said that he wants to run for president and he just might be a black Donald Trump in the making: narcissistic, occasionally clever, obviously gifted but ultimately self destructive. Kanye said he did not vote in the last election but had he done so, Trump would have been his candidate. At a concert this past Saturday he compared himself to Trump and went on to give post-election analysis on why Hillary Clinton lost. His analysis validated the hurt feelings of the “white working-class,” who were privileged enough to endorse a blatant racist for president.

hc-charlotte

Hillary Clinton visited a Black church in Charlotte Sunday, a city still wrestling with the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott at the hands of police. In her address Clinton said, “I am a grandmother and like every grandmother, I worry about the safety and security of my grandchildren. But my worries are not the same as black grandmothers, who have different and deeper fears about the world that their grandchildren face.” Hillary Clinton only had to say that Blacks are more likely to be shot in the streets by the police–whom our tax dollars fund–in order to differentiate herself from the other guy.