Tag: nfl blackout

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When people claim National Anthem protests are disrespectful to the military they are simply using servicemen and women as a cover for their own bigotry. Since Colin Kaepernick began his protest last year critics have embraced the, “this is disrespectful to the military” talking point. Few have stopped to ask who is actually in that military. Black people serve at a higher rate than whites and generally always have. It is obvious that critics, like Trump, are not thinking of the black men and women who’ve served for generations and that oversight is a cruel reminder that for many, black lives do not matter. Using the military as a cover for anti-black sentiment is shameful and must be challenged.

Those who condemn black NFL players for protesting due to an alleged sensitivity of the military couldn’t be thinking of my great-uncle, who served in the Army during the Korean War. After returning to the US he was, in his words, “treated like shit.” Defenders of the flag and military personnel have mentally whitewashed the armed forces, seemingly unaware that racial and ethnic minority groups make up 40% of active-duty military. Black men and women make up roughly 17% of active-duty military, although we are only 13% of all adults between 18 and 44. I doubt that any of the protest critics are thinking of these individuals when they seek to defend the honor of veterans and active military personnel. Don’t they count?

The anti-Kaepernick crowd cannot see that the freedoms they hold so dear are guarded, significantly, by people of color. Their hatred of black people and resentment of black protest produces, in their minds, a whitewashed patriotism that will not acknowledge our military as it is. In this world of whites-only patriotism the actual history of the armed forces vanishes, also. During the Civil War some 179,000 blacks fought for the Union. The irony is there were only 226,152 free blacks living in all the Northern states. During the conflict in Vietnam blacks both served and died disproportionately. Indeed, in 1965 alone black accounted for 25% of all casualties and since that time have comprised over 20% of the Army, while never representing even 15% of the general population. Trump and his followers are not mindful of these men and women and they certainly have not bothered to ask them about their feelings. They simply do not exist, to so many.

I have two grandfathers that served — one in the Air Force and the other in the Navy. They, like the black men and women who serve today, are largely ignored in the debate over the anthem protests. Somehow, white men who’ve never served in the military have managed to own and speak for it. They have no rightful authority to do so. They have no right to whitewash the armed forces. They have no right to use the military as a tool for the perpetuation of white dominance over black lives. All these white men are entitled to do is answer the one outstanding question in this drama and that is, how are they are more offended by a perceived disrespect for the flag than direct atrocities committed against the people for whom it stands?

nfl

I thought integration was supposed to “fix” everything for black people but the NFL proves otherwise. Black players fought decades for full inclusion and today the league is about 70 percent black. But black presence has not translated into black power — ask Colin Kaepernick. The head of the NFL Player’s Association, DeMaurice Smith, is also black. Smith has been actively fighting for Ezekiel Elliott to get back on the field — a man accused of domestic violence — but is largely silent on the issue of Colin Kaepernick. Something is deeply broken and integration clearly isn’t fixing it.

Washington’s franchise was the last to integrate, having done so in 1962. As black people today are boycotting the NFL due to Kaepernick’s treatment, black organizations like CORE and the NACCP targeted the owner of the Washington team with boycotts during the 1950’s. The fight was to get black players integrated into a white organization and ultimately that fight was won. But what value is that victory when, according to Green Bay Packers tight end Martellus Bennett, players are afraid to speak out because “They fear for their jobs, they fear for their well-being?” Martellus’ brother Michael was just recently involved in an incident in which Las Vegas police, according to Michael, pulled a gun on him and threatened to shoot him. Michael likely represents just one more black NFL player who cannot depend on unqualified support from his colleagues. Ezekiel Elliott has no such worry because he represents the violation of a woman’s body and not white men’s unquestioned power over black bodies.

Whether we work for an NFL owner or a progressive nonprofit, black people wrestle with these same realities daily. How black can we be and still keep our job? How much “pro-black” stuff can we post on Facebook before we make our colleagues or a potential employer uncomfortable? When one of our black colleagues experiences an injustice, how wise would it be to stand with them? The NFL is simply a microcosm of daily black life. That is, we as black people are trying to navigate spaces in which our presence is thought to be the ultimate sign of progress. Even so, we are keenly aware that our presence must be muted if we are to maintain it. Daily we observe injustice and endure microaggressions but we understand that to advocate for ourselves might ultimately be our downfall. It is a quiet torture.

Like the NFL players Martellus Bennett described, many of us are afraid everyday of our lives. Those whom we work for and with have no clue. We may be employed but we are certainly not free. As Marvin Gaye so eloquently said, “This ain’t living.” All of this points to the need for black institutions. Yes, it is nice that black people can exist in white spaces in 2017 but existing and freely living are very different. Integration certainly opened up avenues of entry but it didn’t necessarily guarantee true freedom once inside. We shouldn’t forget that and we most certainly should not begin to believe that black institutions are unnecessary.

You may hate what Louis Farrakhan says but he speaks freely because he heads a black institution supported by black people. Charles Barkley on the other hand? Not so much. We must learn from that. I don’t care to enter into integrated spaces if the price of admission is to check my true convictions at the door and remain silent. That is too high a price to pay. Integration is fine and we should take advantage of it but we should also be clear that black institutions are truly a necessity today, just as they were before integration. We must choose to build our own and live freely.